Ricoh's Intelligent eDiscovery Blog

How to Collect, Copy and Move Data Without Changing its Metadata

Dec 17, 2019 11:00:18 AM | Michael Truelove

Metadata is data about data. In a Word file, the document contains all of the data: words, put into paragraphs, displayed on pages. But, as we know, behind the scenes Word also keeps metadata about the document including the author’s name and the date it was created, modified and printed.

In today's Tuesday Tip, we'll be showing you how to collect, copy and move data without accidentally changing the hidden (and extremely important) details about the file. While most eDiscovery tools won’t capture unusual metadata, you can create your own custom fields in Word. These additional fields will allow you to keep track of information that may be useful or pertinent for future reference.

Keep reading to learn how to properly manage your files during the data collection process. 

Read More

Topics: Tuesday's Tip

Boolean Searches 101: How to locate the documents you actually need

Nov 19, 2019 1:54:40 PM | Michael Truelove

Have you ever run a complex Boolean search and didn’t know why some documents were showing up in the results?

Read More

Topics: Tuesday's Tip

Tuesday Tip: Creating a Formula for Padded Zeros in Excel

Oct 22, 2019 3:43:53 PM | Michael Truelove

In a previous Tuesday’s Tip post, we explained what padded zeroes are and how to add them in Excel using apostrophes or by setting the format of the field. Today, we’re sharing an alternative way you can create padded zeros – this time by using a formula. Keep reading to see how you can do this in three easy steps, and (once you’ve got that down pat) how to combine all the steps into one single formula.

Read More

Topics: Tuesday's Tip

Tuesday's Tip: The Critical Questions You Need to Ask When Assessing your eDiscovery Process

Mar 19, 2019 4:13:48 PM | Jamie Chan

Our team of eDiscovery specialists tackle your frequently asked questions and pressing "in the trenches" legal tech topics.

I recently attended a webinar presented by EDRM and Exterro on “How to Evaluate & Improve your eDiscovery Process”. Below are some insightful key questions the presentation outlined, which should be considered if you are assessing your own eDiscovery workflows.

Read More

Topics: Jamie Chan, Tuesday's Tip

Tuesday's Tip: Document Discovery Across Canada

Feb 19, 2019 3:00:00 PM | Jamie Chan

Our team of eDiscovery specialists tackle your frequently asked questions and pressing "in the trenches" legal tech topics.

Tuesday's Tip #6 - Document Discovery Across Canada:

A major component of eDiscovery is the exchange of documents between parties. Often times we are working within in our own jurisdictions, however there are certain cases where you may be dealing with a case in another province. Just like the rules which vary across provinces and territories, so too does the terminology that lists the documents you’ll be disclosing.

Read More

Topics: Jamie Chan, Tuesday's Tip

Tuesday's Tip: Document Families (I Got it From My Mama!)

Dec 18, 2018 5:33:21 PM | Jamie Chan

Our team of eDiscovery specialists tackle your frequently asked questions and pressing "in the trenches" legal tech topics.

Tuesday's Tip #5 - Document Families (I got it from my Mama!):

The terms “parent” and “child” in eDiscovery are used to identify electronic documents and their attachments. Generally speaking, this is most common with emails – the email being the parent document and the child(ren) being the attachment(s) to the email. Both the email and attachments together are referred to as a “document family”, and just like human families, they can become more complex when emails contain additional emails with attachments (sometimes referred to as grandchildren documents).

Read More

Topics: Jamie Chan, Tuesday's Tip

Tuesday's Tip: Padded Zeros

Nov 20, 2018 3:15:34 PM | Jamie Chan

Our team of eDiscovery specialists tackle your frequently asked questions and pressing "in the trenches" legal tech topics.

Tuesday's Tip #4 - Padded Zeros:

Padded zeros or leading zeros are the zeros at the beginning of a number. By default, when you enter this kind of number into Excel, the cell will adjust to “General” formatting and the leading zeros will be dropped. This function can create an annoyance when adding zeros in front of your numbers is needed to manipulate data, whether you’re using it to sort documents or create new numbering.

Read More

Topics: Jamie Chan, Tuesday's Tip

Tuesday's Tip: Native File Processing

Oct 16, 2018 4:44:21 PM | Jamie Chan

Our team of eDiscovery specialists tackle your frequently asked questions and pressing "in the trenches" legal tech topics.

Tuesday's Tip #3 - Native File Processing:

When going through document exchange protocols with your vendor, make sure to ask about native file processing. Native files provide major advantages in a production since they contain additional information like metadata, allow for text-searching, are more compact in file size, and preserve the overall integrity of data.

Read More

Topics: Jamie Chan, Tuesday's Tip

Tuesday's Tip: Transposing Data

Sep 18, 2018 4:39:21 PM | Jamie Chan

Our team of eDiscovery specialists tackle your frequently asked questions and pressing "in the trenches" legal tech topics.

Tuesday's Tip #2 - Transposing Data:

Converting rows to columns (or vice versa) is called transposing and it’s a feature available in our trusty old friend, Excel. There's a little trick I find particularly useful when I need to provide a report on which fields are included in a load file, or when I need to cross-check load files received from another party against the list of agreed fields on a document exchange protocol.

Read More

Topics: Jamie Chan, Tuesday's Tip

Tuesday's Tip: Load to Joy!

Aug 21, 2018 2:00:00 PM | Jamie Chan

Our team of eDiscovery specialists tackle your frequently asked questions and pressing "in the trenches" legal tech topics.

Tuesday's Tip #1 - Load Files:

To ensure a seamless and painless exchange, it’s always best to have a document exchange protocol in place or at the very least, a discussion with opposing counsel and/or your litigation support vendors regarding the format of load files.

Read More

Topics: Jamie Chan, Tuesday's Tip