Tuesday's Tip: Document Discovery Across Canada

Posted by Jamie Chan

Feb 19, 2019 3:00:00 PM

Our team of eDiscovery specialists tackle your frequently asked questions and pressing "in the trenches" legal tech topics.

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Tuesday's Tip #6 - Document Discovery Across Canada:

A major component of eDiscovery is the exchange of documents between parties. Often times we are working within in our own jurisdictions, however there are certain cases where you may be dealing with a case in another province. Just like the rules which vary across provinces and territories, so too does the terminology that lists the documents you’ll be disclosing.

Below we've compiled a handy guide you can refer to when you’re dealing with lists of documents across the country. 

Province 

Document  

British Columbia 

List of Documents  

Alberta 

Affidavit of Records 

Saskatchewan 

Affidavit of Documents  

Manitoba 

Affidavit of Documents 

Ontario 

Affidavit of Documents 

Quebec 

Affidavit (Divulgation de la preuve électronique)

Newfoundland 

List of Documents 

Nova Scotia 

Affidavit Disclosing Documents 

Prince Edward Island 

Affidavit of Documents 

New Brunswick 

Affidavit of Documents 

Yukon Territories 

Affidavit of Documents 

Northwest Territories 

Statement as to Documents 

Nunavut 

Statement as to Documents 

Don't forget, if you have a question for our team or a topic you'd like us to cover, comment or tweet us using #ReDTuesdaysTip.


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Topics: Jamie Chan, Tuesday's Tip

   

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